what does your ad say about you?

Think about how your ad comes across to others - what does it say about you? idkblog.comGoing Going Gone is among us ladies! It’s a very exciting time to be a consultant or hostess!! We have so much info to share with our clients and an entire month to do so. Remember how I was talking about limiting your graphic noise last week?  I would like to expand on that topic a little further. Last week I focused on sharing your ads, how to space them out, and slim them down. I think this is the perfect time to talk about your graphics and how your audience reads them.

Make it Count!

If your word graphic needs ten separate lines of text go ahead and throw it out the window. Have you ever seen a Pepsi or Olay ad in a magazine that had ten lines of text? Nope and it’s because humans have a reeeeally short attention span in regards to marketing. If you put a full page of text in front of me, I have to read something I didn’t even log in for and, I immediately move on – irritating! It’s just like trying to sit through an informative video that someone else posted. If it’s not very entertaining i’m sorry but I have about a million other things that I’m ignoring right now – time to go.

We really need to think about what our graphic says about us. Don’t be that girl at the high school reunion that starts talking about her kids/family/life/car and doesn’t come up for air! Your ad speaks on your behalf so make it count!!


How Does Your Message Sound in a Conversation?

Avoid overly wordy graphics like this! It has 3 separate messages - too much for 1 ad. Learn more at idkblog.com
This ad is saying too much at once and will turn off your audience.

Here is a prime example of what’s constantly circulating around Jamland. It’s pretty and gentle on the eyes but it contains three. separate. messages! 1. I started a business. 2. It’s a nail business. 3. Ask me how to get them for FREE. You can’t tell someone all of this info in one breath, it’s just too much content. They have no idea what the product is and you are already inviting them to talk to you about getting free loot. It’s weird. If you’ve just started your consulting business 1) Congratulations!! So much fun! 2) Try not to burn through your personal marketing posts with one click. Spread them out and make them count!

The Fix

This overly aggressive wordy graphic can be easily fixed. Just break up the separate subjects into their own posts.

focus on 1 message per text graphic - idkblog.com
Posting 3 messages over the course of a week gives you 3 chances to grab the attention of your audience without ending up in the unfriend zone. The first post will get your friends and family so excited! The second will get them thinking about what it is you are up to. By the third you will have their full attention.

How about a graphic with one subject that goes on, and on, and on…

example-of-excessive-info-in-advertisement-small
WHOA! 4 different colors, 3 different fonts, lots and lots of words, embellishments everywhere – please don’t download this graphic. Read on sister. ;)

I copied this text and basic design from a FB group – sorry if you see this!! 😉 This graphic focuses in on one subject, yay – nice job! However, it has 7 lines of text along with a bunch of decorations atop a background containing it’s own visual interest. There’s just so much going on!

Ask yourself…

Is the message clear? Are there any words I can cut out and still end up with a clear message? It’s a basic advertising move – use as few words on your graphic as possible to get your point across.

Get right to the point with your word graphics. Learn more at idkblog.com
Simple is key. If you need to include the subscription deadline put it in the accompanying post text. The visible deadline gives your client an easy out and will shut the deal down before they click for further info.

I have really slimmed this ad down to the bare bones here – two lines of text (five words!) that gets right to the point. Yes, I have 3 additional lines at the bottom, I think of that as the fine print. If you need extra text to further support your statement then it is fine print and should be treated as such. However, lets be sure it doesn’t turn into a pharmaceutical ad here! Use as few words as possible and I will let you keep a star. 

Notice that I ditched the deadline on the 15th? That’s the caveat to the deal and isn’t working to sell the subscription, it’s working to cancel the subscription – take it out of your ad. It’s the reeeaaally fine print that should only be seen in the post text that will accompany this ad. You want to entice your client, get them to click for further info, and get them thinking about the deal. If you throw a deadline in their face, well, you get the point.

As we promote Going Going Gone it’s so easy to get caught up in the list of products – the astounding number of retiring wraps is devastating!! Remember that your ad campaign speaks on your behalf – what does it say about you?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *